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Michelin sustainable rubber criticised for deforestation

Tyre giant Michelin and green group WWF have been criticised by researchers over a rubber plantation in Indonesia that was billed as protecting the environment, but which villagers say has caused deforestation, destroyed elephant habitat and resulted in land grabs.

In 2015, Michelin be...

Solitary confinement is bad for the heart too

Solitary confinement does little to rehabilitate inmates, is extremely expensive (where the average per-cell cost is $75,000), and exacerbates health problems — yet the American prison system is over-reliant on solitary confinement. In fact, a 2018 report found that, 61,000 individuals were be...

Elective and nonelective cesarean section and obesity among young adult male offspring: A Swedish population–based cohort study

Previous studies have suggested that cesarean section (CS) is associated with offspring overweight and obesity. However, few studies have been able to differentiate between elective and nonelective CS, which may differ in their maternal risk profile and biological pathway. Therefore, we aimed ...

Do “Instagram vs. Reality” Posts Make a Difference?

Interest in the psychological impact of Instagram has grown as the photo-based social media platform continues to increase in popularity.  Over 37 percent of U.S. adults are Instagram users, and teens use Instagram more than any other social media platform. The average user spends nearly a hal...

Animated videos advance adoption of agriculture techniques

The study, published in the journal Information Technology for Development, demonstrated that two years after being shown an educational animated video on a postharvest bean storage method, farmers in Mozambique had a 97% retention rate and 89% adoption of the storage solution.

"Thes...

Dogs hear words the same way we do

Say “sit!” to your dog, and—if he’s a good boy—he’ll likely plant his rump on the floor. But would he respond correctly if the word were spoken by a stranger, or someone with a thick accent? A new study shows he will, suggesting dogs perceive spoken words in a sophisticated way long thought un...

E. coli bacteria engineered to eat carbon dioxide

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Understanding nonbelievers’ prejudice toward ideological opponents: The role of self-expression values and other-oriented dispositions | DIAL.pr - BOREAL

Research adopting the ideological-conflict hypothesis indicates that low religiosity, nonbelief, and antireligious sentiments predict prejudice toward ideological opponents. How to understand this, from an individual differences perspective, given that nonbelievers are typically open-m...

Mosquitoes armed with bacteria beat back dengue virus

NATIONAL HARBOR, MARYLAND—In a handful of cities around the world, mosquitoes have been armed with a microscopic weapon against disease. The bacterium Wolbachia pipientis blocks the insects’ ability to spread fearsome viruses such as dengue, Zika, and chikungunya. Since 2011, researchers have ...